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At the end of college basketball Final Four in San Antonio next April, the winning players and coaches will cut down the nets and make snow angels in the confetti covering the floor, just as they always do. Then One Shining Moment will play, alumni will choke up with tears and NCAA officials will bask in the glory of their annual showcase event.

But this time will be different than all the others before it.

No matter who wins or loses, high level college basketball was unmasked Tuesday as a magnet for corruption, bribery and kickbacks it always has been behind the scenes. It took an FBI sting operation, a financial adviser turned cooperating witness and a shoe company so eager to cut deals and pull strings with prospects that the dots weren even very hard for prosecutors to connect.

Though four assistant coaches were arrested and charged with crimes, we still a long way from figuring out all the implications here, from the number of coaches that eventually will be roped into the scandal to how much shrapnel will hit the schools that employed them. The tentacles already have reached some of biggest names in the sport including an assistant for the preseason No. 1 team in Arizona, a Louisville prospect recruitment and an assistant who helped build the roster South Carolina took to the Final Four last season.

Let just say the timing couldn have been more perfect.

Though only a handful of schools will show up on the ESPN ticker or be mentioned by the network news, including Auburn, Arizona, Southern California and Oklahoma State, there is no university president, athletic administrator or coaching staff in the country that should feel safe today. attorney Joon Kim referred to the underbelly of college basketball that was exposed in the indictments. And though it took the investigative tools of the FBI to bring it out of the shadows, what he outlined as a criminal scheme is what college basketball coaches have long referred to as, quite simply, how things get done.

No, it not every program. It not every head coach. It not every prospect.

But when the NCAA and the NBA ceded the entire responsibility of grassroots basketball to the shoe companies, they could use it to cultivate relationships with top players and legally fund the teams that were shuttling prospects to tournaments where college coaches could watch them by day and representatives of agents and financial advisers could meet them at night. Those meetings could take place in hotel rooms, restaurants, casinos, even bathrooms,
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without the NCAA having a prayer of regulating how the money was rolling downhill. And if you didn have a way to get into that game, whether it an agent wanting a potential client under the protective eye of a friendly coach or a shoe company representative bridging the gap between the grassroots program they fund and a college program they sponsor, you likely had no shot landing the top players in the country.

The indictment details a classic example that seems to describe Louisville recruitment of five star prospect Brian Bowen but could easily be the template for dozens of recruitments every year. Essentially, the government alleges that the request of at least one coach from University 6 (purported to be Louisville), the defendants in the case including a former NBA agent, an Adidas executive and a financial planner to funnel $100,000 (payable in four installments) from Company 1 to the family of Player 10. Shortly after the agreement with the family of Player 10 was reached in late May and early June, Player =10 publicly committed to University 6).

The evidence for that claim was found on a wiretap of of Christian Dawkins, the former agent. And as news of that allegation spread Tuesday morning, it didn take long for reporters to uncover an interview from this June in which Rick Pitino described to Terry Meiners of 840 AM radio in Louisville how he landed Bowen.

got lucky on this one, Pitino said. had an AAU director call me and ask if I be interested in a player. I saw him against another great player from Indiana. I said, I be really interested. They had to come in unofficially, pay for their hotel, pay for their meals. We spent zero dollars recruiting a five star athlete who I loved when I saw him play. In my 40 years of coaching this is the luckiest I been. quote alone is damning in light of this investigation, and if the allegations are true it should finally get Pitino and athletics director Tom Jurich fired after they have already survived multiple scandals that would have done in less powerful people.

They probably won be the only ones to lose their careers in disgrace.

But the big names that will eventually get drawn into this, whether through more witnesses flipping or the FBI new tip line, are more than individual actors who will wear the NCAA scarlet letter while the rest of the sport beats its chest about doing things the right way.

That not how this scandal is going to play out.

For the first time, an organization with the motivation and the resources to pull back the curtain on widespread corruption in college sports has revealed what everybody kind of knew but couldn exactly prove.

Today, everybody wakes up in an entirely new world: coaches wondering if the FBI is listening to their phone calls, administrators wondering who their employees are making deals with, fans wondering about the real stories behind all those crazy recruitments they addicted to following.

It entirely too early to say what that means or where it goes, but the biggest charade in the history of college sports has now been shattered, along with careers and reputations and the illusion of amateurism that brought billions into college sports.
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adidas boat shoes COLLEGE NOTEBOOK

Sarah Kline (Lindsey Wilson volleyball, Jr.) at Brescia, Sept. 4, 3 0 win: match high 18 assists, eight digs, two kills, two aces; home vs. Cumberland, Sept. 8, 3 2 win: match high 47 assists, five kills, three blocks (three assist); notes: Kline was named the Mid South Conference Setter of the Week.

Lisa Miville (Bellarmine women cross country, So.) Madison Kiwanis Invitational, Sept. 6: 36th in 21:13.15.

Kellen Krammes (Hanover football, Fr.) notes: Krammes saw action in the Panthers 46 22 loss at Centre last Saturday.

Emma LaDuke (IU Southeast women tennis, Fr.) home vs. Hanover, Sept. 9, 7 2 win: No. 2 doubles, 8 4.

Lauren McCartin (IU Southeast volleyball, Fr.) at Mt. Vernon Nazarene, Sept. 6, 3 1 loss: 12 digs; vs. Concordia in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, Sept. 6, 3 1 loss: 16 digs.

Caitlin Morency (Anderson volleyball, Jr.) vs. Maryville, Hanover Invitational, Sept. 5, 3 1 loss: team high 24 digs, two kills; vs. Centre, Hanover Invitational, Sept. 5, 3 0 win: team high 24 digs, two aces; at Hanover, Hanover Invitational, Sept. 6, 3 0 loss: team high 18 digs, team high two aces, two kills; vs. Principia, Hanover Invitational, Sept. 6, 3 0 loss: team high 20 digs; home vs. DePauw, Sept. 10, 3 1 loss: team high 26 digs, four kills, team high two aces.

Erin Peak (Morehead State volleyball, Sr.) vs. 5, 3 0 win: eight kills, four digs, match high three aces; vs. West Virginia, Winthrop Classic, Sept. 6, 3 1 win: nine kills, three aces; vs. Winthrop, Winthrop Classic, Sept. 6, 3 0 win: seven kills, three digs; at Marshall, Sept. 9, 3 0 win: five kills, three digs, three blocks (one solo, two assist).

Brad Snook (Bradley men soccer, Sr.) notes: Snook came off the bench in a scoreless tie with visiting Northern Illinois last Sunday.

Kelsey Wisman (IU Southeast women tennis, Fr.) home vs. Hanover, Sept. 9, 7 2 win: No. 4 singles win, 3 6, 7 5 (10 8).

Brandon Bottorff (Hanover men soccer, So.) notes: Bottorff played a reserve role in the Panthers 4 1 loss to Wittenberg in the first game of the Trine Invitational in Angola last Saturday.

Trea Burgess (Indiana football, So.) home vs. Murray State, Sept. 6, 45 3 win: eight carries on 29 yards.

Dan Coats (Bellarmine men cross country, Fr.) Madison Kiwanis Invitational, Sept. 6: 47th in 27:46.30.

Neal Masterson (Bellarmine men cross country, So.) notes: Masterson did not run in the Madison Kiwanis Invitational in Hanover last Saturday due to a knee injury.

Felicia Adams (Hanover women soccer, Jr.) at Capital, Sept. 7, 3 0 loss: one shot, one shot on goal; at Marian, Sept. 10, 2 0 loss: one shot.

Jordan Carroll (Hanover men soccer, Sr.) notes: Carroll started as a defender in the Panthers two losses at the Trine Invitational in Angola last weekend.

Cordario Collier (Thomas More football, Jr.) home vs. John Carroll, Sept. 6, 41 14 loss: 10 carries for 27 yards, three receptions for 31 yards, two rushing TDs.

Chris Farley (Thomas More football, Jr.) notes: Farley saw action in last Saturday 41 14 home setback with John Carroll.

Stephanie Lynch (Purdue volleyball, Sr.) vs. Tennessee Tech, Ball State Active Ankle Challenge in Muncie, Sept. 5, 3 0 win: match high 10 kills, five blocks (five assist), two digs; vs. Ball State, Ball State Active Ankle Challenge, Sept. 6, 3 0 win: seven kills, match high five blocks (one solo, four assist); vs. Southern Illinois, Ball State Active Ankle Challenge, Sept. 6, 3 0 win: match high 11 kills, two digs, team high two blocks (one solo, one assist); notes: Lynch made the all tournament team at the Active Ankle Challenge. She also became the Boilermakers all time leader in block assists on Aug. 30 against Tennessee State.

James Madere (Hanover football, So.) notes: Madere played in last Saturday 46 22 setback at Centre.

Tabbitha Shirley (St. Catherine women soccer, Fr.) notes: Shirley was the goalkeeper in St. Catherine 3 1 home loss to Cincinnati Christian last Friday.

Michele Sizemore (Marian women tennis, Sr.) at Grace, Sept. 6, 7 2 loss: No. 4 singles win, 2 6, 7 5, 6 4; No. 1 doubles loss, 8 4; at Franklin, Sept. 7, 5 4 win: No. 4 singles win, 6 2, 7 6; No. 1 doubles loss, 8 3; at St. Francis, Sept. 9, 7 2 win: No. 4 singles win, 6 2, 6 1; No. 1 doubles win, 8 4.

Hannah Sullivan (Ball State volleyball, So.) vs. Purdue, Ball State Active Ankle Challenge, Sept. 6, 3 0 loss: six kills; vs. Tennessee Tech, Ball State Active Ankle Challenge, Sept. 6, 3 2 loss: eight kills, four digs; home vs. IUPUI, Sept. 9, 3 1 loss: nine kills, seven digs.
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adidas run College basketball games can get here fast enough

Friday’s opening matchups are meh. Virginia UNC Greensboro; Virginia Tech Detroit Mercy; William and Mary High Point; Old Dominion Towson; Hampton Rider.

Regionally and nationally, the fare isn’t much better. Texas A Virginia and Georgia Tech UCLA, the latter in Shanghai no less, are exceptions.

Scandal is hardly new for the sport, which has endured point shaving, vacated Final Fours and hookers for recruits. During last season’s NCAA tournament, Showtime aired a documentary on the 2003 murder of a Baylor basketball player by a teammate.

And it’s scandal we have anew, thank goodness simply outrageous rather than tragic. Moreover, two Adidas employees are charged with paying prospects’ families in hopes of the prospects signing with Adidas affiliated universities.

Prosecutors continue to pursue other leads in college basketball’s recruiting underworld, and coaches such as ODU’s Jeff Jones, Virginia Tech’s Buzz Williams and Notre Dame’s Mike Brey believe more unpleasantness awaits.

All of this absolutely merits attention, and the calls from the likes of ACC commissioner John Swofford and ESPN analyst Jay Bilas for sport specific NCAA legislation are spot on. But the athletes and coaches, a vast majority of whom have scruples, also deserve a look as the season approaches.

Thanks in large measure to VCU and Virginia, the commonwealth has sent multiple teams to the NCAA Division I tournament each of the last nine years. The Rams have earned a state record seven consecutive bids, while Tony Bennett’s Cavaliers have made the field five of the last six seasons.

Virginia Tech, Hampton, ODU, Norfolk State, Richmond, George Mason,
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James Madison and Radford also have contributed, most notably Mason, which advanced to the 2006 Final Four, setting the table for VCU’s run five years later.

Surely some of those programs will grace the bracket in March, but none approaches what you would call a lock. Media/coaches polls picked Virginia and Virginia Tech sixth and seventh, respectively, in the ACC, Norfolk State and Hampton second and fourth in the Mid Eastern Athletic Conference, VCU fourth in the Atlantic 10, ODU fourth in Conference USA.

Those are your best bets.

Check that. Expanding our horizons to include Division III reveals Christopher Newport, as usual, as a national contender.

Coaching transition is an annual sporting ritual, and the most notable in our orbit is VCU’s Mike Rhoades. He succeeds Will Wade, who left for LSU after two seasons leading the Rams.

A former VCU assistant under Shaka Smart, Rhoades brings 13 years of head coaching experience to Broad Street, 10 at Randolph Macon and the last three at Rice. Extending the Rams’ NCAA streak to eight seasons will be difficult, but he does have credentialed seniors in Justin Tillman and Jonathan Williams.

With only one scholarship upperclassman, Grayson Allen, Duke is No. 1 in the preseason Associated Press and Amway coaches polls, a testament to Mike Krzyzewski’s recruiting and the sport’s overall youth. Having seen Blue Devils freshmen Marvin Bagley III, Wendell Carter Jr., and Gary Trent Jr., I understand the hype.

This is Krzyzewski’s 38th season at Duke, and suffice to say he’s accustomed to No. 1 status. Per a tweet from Bilas, a starter on the Blue Devils’ 1986 Final Four squad,
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Duke has played more games at No. 1 under Krzyzewski (223) than it has when unranked (145).

adidas originals women Colts capture 3A crown

Some schools wait awhile. Some have never experienced the thrill of hoisting the Gold Ball. For the CasteelColts that won’t be an issue. This was a quick rise to the top of the 3A mountain.

In year number three of existence, albeit without a senior class, Coach Spencer Stowers and the Colts reached the summit of high school success winning 35 28 over Tucson Pusch Ridge Academy in the 3A state championship game Saturday night at Campo Verde high school.

It wasn’t easy. By any stretch. Turnovers plagued the Colts early. A key injury took a hit or so we thought out to their explosive offense. The top ranked Lions throwing everything but the kitchen since at them.

A Mack Johnson fumble at the 11 yard line was the initial miscue setting them back on this championship evening. The Lions struck two plays later with a Gavin Davis burst from six out.

Cue Gunner Cruz. The offense has put up points all season (692 to be exact). So why should tonight be different? A six play eighty yard drive was the response,
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culminating in a Kyheem Waleed 44 yard connection from his signal caller.

A 35 point explosion in the 2nd Quarter kept the crowd entertained. Each team responding to each other. A Zach Nelson 12 yard score gave Casteel a lead on a 9 play 80 yard drive.

But Casteel coughed it back up and four plays later a Mitch Maas 36 yard reception tied it at 14. Mack Johnson broke one for 15 and Waleed a second from 26 were the other two scores in the first 24 minutes.

“They’re a good football team.” Cruz said. “They kept fighting. The two fumbles hurt us without question. Take those away who knows maybe we put it away earlier. It’s mute now. We stayed composed. My boys kept fighting,”

That they did. 330 yards of offense in the first half gave them a 28 21 cushion.

With a chance to break it open to start the second half Cruz threw a pick to Maas. Turnover number three didn’t amount to much for the Lions as they went three and out.

Pusch Ridge showed why they are ranked no. 1 as they tied it with9:42remaining.

Back to work. Actually Mack to work.

A 13 play 84 yard drive featuring six carries from Johnson was the decisive break the Colts needed to put this away. Johnson sprinted in from 2 yards out on 4th and Goal for the go ahead score.

“I’m ready for the ball at all times. It’s just great coach has this kind of confidence in me. That was a great opponent and we just grinded it out tonight,” stated the tired Johnson.

Four defensive stops later Casteel made history. Defensive lineman Jehrt Flitton was ecstatic.

“We’ve put in so much work and it’s paid off. We knew they had a mobile Quarterback and that was their offense. Couldn’t be happier for this group of guys. We allowed some yards but at the end all that matters is we got one final stop.

Coach Stowers carried that precedent.

“Great group of kids they boughtin three yearsago. Everyone associated with the program has believed in what we are doing. Just a special team that has worked hard and they deserve it.”
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adidas original zx flux College basketball takes a big hit with arrests

TUCSON, Ariz. University of Arizona assistant basketball coach Emanuel Richardson entered the federal court wearing the same clothes he was arrested in earlier in the day, there to face charges of accepting bribes and paying at least one recruit to attend the school.

Across the country, nine other people, including three more assistant coaches, were arrested after a federal probe revealed hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes to influence star athletes choice of schools, shoe sponsors, agents, even tailors.

The arrests will have an immediate and potentially long lasting impact on the programs involved. As the tentacles of the probe reach deeper into college basketball, more schools could come into the crosshairs and the black eye on the sport could darken. Attorney Joon H. Kim said.

Richardson, along with fellow assistant coaches Chuck Person of Auburn, Southern California Tony Bland and Oklahoma State Lamont Evans were all suspended after charges against them were announced.

James Gatto, director of global sports marketing for basketball at Adidas, Rashan Michel, a maker of custom suits for some of the NBA biggest stars, and various financial advisers and managers also were charged.

Federal prosecutors said at least three top high school recruits were promised payments of as much as $150,000, using money supplied by Adidas, to attend two universities sponsored by the athletic shoe company. Court papers didn name the schools but contained enough details to identify them as Louisville and Miami.

Louisville is already under NCAA probation over a sex scandal after an investigation into a Cardinals staffer hiring escorts for sex parties and to strip for recruits and players. The NCAA said Louisville must vacate up to 123 victories earned with ineligible players and suspended Louisville coach Rick Pitino five games for failing to monitor staffer Andre McGee.

Pitino also had to testify in 2010 in a federal extortion trial for the wife of the school equipment manager, when he acknowledged under oath to having an extramarital affair with her in a Louisville restaurant.

Pitino is not named in the federal documents, though the school acknowledged it is under investigation by the FBI.

allegations come as a complete shock to me. Attorney Office that these third party schemes, initiated by a few bad actors, operated to commit a fraud on the impacted universities and their basketball programs, including the University of Louisville, Pitino said in a statement. fans and supporters deserve better and I am committed to taking whatever steps are needed to ensure those responsible are held accountable. as the leader of the program, Pitino could end up taking the blame if the allegations prove to be true. The NCAA could also give Louisville the death penalty, grounding the basketball powerhouse.

Auburn coach Bruce Pearl could face similar heat.

He coached at Tennessee from 2005 11 before being fired and hit with a three year show cause penalty by the NCAA for lying to investigators about recruiting violations. Pearl was given a second chance at Auburn, but another scandal could spell trouble for him if the allegations are proven true.

Regardless of whether the federal probe leads all the way to the top, the programs could take a hit and not just from the NCAA.

With the prospect of an NCAA investigation on the horizon, top recruits may stay away. Current players in the programs could be declared ineligible if the probe finds they accepted money from an agent or an assistant coach.

Arizona coach Sean Miller has one of the top recruiting classes for 2018, and the Wildcats have been projected to be a top 10 team this season. Andy Enfield has a strong incoming recruiting class at Southern California and has a potential top 10 team this season.

The trajectory of the two Pac 12 programs could be altered as the probe deepens.

And the initial charges could be just the tip of the iceberg. More programs and coaches could be entangled as the FBI digs deeper, and schools where the arrested coaches previously worked could face scrutiny.
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adidas grand slam College Roundup

NAVY WOMEN’S SOCCER: Four different UConn players found the back of the net as the 25th ranked Huskies (3 0) defeated the Mids, 4 2, on Sunday at the Glenn Warner Soccer Facility. The Huskies snapped the Mids nine match home winning streak.

For Navy (2 2), sophomore Natalie Dzhandzhapanyan scored in the first half and freshman Karli Sottung added a second half goal off an assist by freshman Eleanor Pratt. Navy goalkeeper Dayton Wetherby tallied nine saves on 13 chances to fall to 1 2 in net.

NAVY MEN’S SOCCER: The Mids tied No. 23 Penn State (1 0 1), 1 1, in a double overtime contest on Sunday afternoon at Jeffrey Field. Along with its 1 0 win at West Virginia on Friday, Navy opens the 2015 season with a 1 0 1 record.

Trailing 1 0, Navy drew even in the 69th minute on a header by senior captain Derek Vogel Senior Jamie Dubyoski’s throw in from the right side was met by Vogel, who blasted it past Penn State goalkeeper Matt Bersano.

Navy carried the run of play in the match and outshot Penn State by the wide margin of 17 5. Navy also led in shots on goal,
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8 4, and corner kicks, 4 3.

Senior Thomas Shiiba took a game high four shots.

Navy is 2 0 2 in its last four games against Top 25 opponents. Dating back to last season, Navy is unbeaten in its last 13 games at 8 0 5.

Penn State was an NCAA Tournament Second Round team in 2014.

Navy will next host Oakland on Friday, Sept. 4 at the Glenn Warner Soccer Facility before hosting Ohio State on Sunday, Sept. 6. Both Oakland and Ohio State advanced to the NCAA Tournament Second Round in 2014.

MARYLAND MEN’S SOCCER: Sparked by three goals in a five minute span to begin the second half, the No. 13 Terps defeated St. John’s, 4 0, in the adidas/IU Credit Union Classic Sunday.
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We talking Adidas employees being accused of helping payoffs to high school recruits families to steer players toward programs with Adidas deals and then back to Adidas when they turn professional.

And the head coaches knew absolutely nothing about it, right?

We talking NCAA, eventually. And the death penalty. We talking college basketball programs that won be basketball programs anymore. We talking firings or coaches suddenly leaving to more time with my family. Put Louisville Rick Pitino down for one or the other.

Louisville has admitted that it is one of the subjects of the federal probe. It already on NCAA probation for using prostitutes to lure recruits. It looks like Miami also might be part of the probe.

The list will grow.

No one knows where any of this will end.

It is sure to mushroom.

Why, guys haven even started cutting deals yet.

Will there be enough teams left for a tournament field of 68?

Welcome to The Final Three!

But are we really, truly shocked? Perhaps by the scope of it, but we have always assumed there had to be a sinister underbelly in the college game, temptation everywhere, even more than in college football, because basketball is a set up where one special player one kid could take a program to national heights.

There is so much money in the pot.

There had to be sleaze. Right?

Oh, is there sleaze.

And here comes the cleansing. The NCAA might need to suspend play for a season just to separate the saints from the sinners. Wonder who lead on that scoreboard.
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cheap adidas superstar Colyer evades shouting group in Aggieville

After talking with constituents in Bluestem Bistro on Saturday, Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer evaded a group of people shouting and questioning his position on Medicaid. The group followed him to his car in an Aggieville parking lot, and the governor appeared to drive away, though he later came to his next scheduled stop down the street.

The group of residents asked the governor whether he would sign a bipartisan bill to expand Medicaid, and they said Colyer tried to “lecture” them and didn’t give satisfactory answers.

Medicaid is a federal and state health care program for low income families. Expanding the program in Kansas, which would cover about 180,000 more adults, has gained bipartisan support in the state legislature. Colyer, a conservative Republican, has openly opposed the expansion.

Colyer stopped at Bluestem Bistro Saturday afternoon to meet with constituents. He also planned to visit Varsity Donuts afterward, where he was to speak with members of the media, but when some of the people continued to ask him about Medicaid expansion, he walked out of the coffee shop and down the street, climbed in his vehicle and left. A group of about 15 people followed him to his car, shouting at him.

“Expand Medicaid,” people shouted as Coyler’s driver started the engine and shut the back door. “Expand Medicaid or lose your job!”

Colyer drove away, but he did go to Varsity Donuts about 15 minutes later, according to reports.

Colyer was sworn in as governor on Jan. 31 after former Gov. Sam Brownback left for a job in the Trump administration as ambassador at large for religious freedom. Brownback vetoed an expansion of Medicaid last year after it passed both chambers. Lawmakers nearly had enough votes to override.

Brandon Irwin of Manhattan said the governor’s argument against expanding Medicaid doesn’t make sense, because the state already has paid federal taxes that go toward expanding the program.

“He’s trying to make an economic argument against it, saying that we can’t afford it, which is frankly a ridiculous argument,” Irwin said. “Kansas already pays for it. We’ve paid our federal taxes ever since the (Affordable Care Act) expansion, which has accumulated up to the amount of $2 billion dollars that the federal government wants to give back to us.”

Refusing to expand Medicaid means Kansans’ federal taxes are paying for Medicaid in other states that have chosen to expand their program, Irwin said.

Neil Baker, a longtime Manhattan resident and a biological science technician for the USDA, said the group was trying to get Colyer to talk about expansion because a bill regarding the issue is set for a hearing in the legislature soon.

“It’s an issue that’s been pressing for well over a year now, since the ACA came out, they wanted to expand,” Baker said. “And we’re afraid that he’s going to take the exact same stance that Brownback took since he’s already stated that he feels the same way. He’s just like Brownback so he’s not going to change.”

He said Colyer’s response to those asking about Medicaid was pretty much the same. Baker said he lectured them, assuming people didn’t really understand although some of the people questioning him practice medicine and understand how healthcare works.

“He’s not the only one who understands how it works,” he said. “But I guess that’s just what politicians do, they kind of talk down.”

Some of the Manhattan residents in the group said they intended to drive to Wamego, Colyer’s next and final stop in a series of coffee shop visits throughout the day.

KMAN AM radio reported that Colyer actually did return to Varsity Donuts 15 minutes later and answered questions then.

“Here’s the issue,” Colyer told KMAN. “If you talk to Kansans, they’re not interested in expanding Obamacare. And what we’ve seen is that what Obamacare did is it took money out of Medicare, which is for seniors, and it has damaged all of our hospitals. And it’s really had a terrible effect on our state. And it’s driven up the cost of everybody’s insurance mine, yours.”

Colyer, a plastic surgeon, said he thinks the state needs a more “Kansas based solution” that would be more affordable.

Speaking about the prevalence of Medicaid related questions during his Manhattan stop, he told KMAN that the state has other issues, such as school finance, that are important to address.

ArticlesK State earns No. 9 seed in NCAA tourney, faces Creighton in 1st roundPolice make 13 Fake Patty’s Day related arrestsK State great Evans focused on ‘playing in the moment’Man killed in Wamego ID’d, witness shares videoSeth Childs 12 to close for good next weekCentral Plains boys capture first ever state titleManhattan’s Raising Cane’s to open in early summerReal Manhattan miracle: Before he became K State’s coach, Frank Martin nearly diedK State’s memorable 1976 77 season derailed in NCAA tourneyOld Navy coming to Manhattan
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adidas superstars white College basketball takes big hit with arrests linked to bribes

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) University of Arizona assistant basketball coach Emanuel Richardson entered the federal court wearing the same clothes he was arrested in earlier in the day, there to face charges of accepting bribes and paying at least one recruit to attend the school.

Across the country, nine other people, including three more assistant coaches, were arrested after a federal probe revealed hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes to influence star athletes’ choice of schools, shoe sponsors, agents, even tailors.

The arrests will have an immediate and potentially long lasting impact on the programs involved. As the tentacles of the probe reach deeper into college basketball, more schools could come into the crosshairs and the black eye on the sport could darken. Attorney Joon H. Kim said.

Richardson, along with fellow assistant coaches Chuck Person of Auburn, Southern California’s Tony Bland and Oklahoma State’s Lamont Evans were all suspended after charges against them were announced.

James Gatto, director of global sports marketing for basketball at Adidas, Rashan Michel, a maker of custom suits for some of the NBA’s biggest stars, and various financial advisers and managers also were charged.

Federal prosecutors said at least three top high school recruits were promised payments of as much as $150,000, using money supplied by Adidas, to attend two universities sponsored by the athletic shoe company. Court papers didn’t name the schools but contained enough details to identify them as Louisville and Miami.

Louisville is already under NCAA probation over a sex scandal after an investigation into a Cardinals staffer hiring escorts for sex parties and to strip for recruits and players. The NCAA said Louisville must vacate up to 123 victories earned with ineligible players and suspended Louisville coach Rick Pitino five games for failing to monitor staffer Andre McGee.

Pitino also had to testify in 2010 in a federal extortion trial for the wife of the school’s equipment manager, when he acknowledged under oath to having an extramarital affair with her in a Louisville restaurant.

Pitino is not named in the federal documents, though the school acknowledged it is under investigation by the FBI.

“These allegations come as a complete shock to me. Attorney’s Office that these third party schemes, initiated by a few bad actors, operated to commit a fraud on the impacted universities and their basketball programs, including the University of Louisville,” Pitino said in a statement. “Our fans and supporters deserve better and I am committed to taking whatever steps are needed to ensure those responsible are held accountable.”

But, as the leader of the program, Pitino could end up taking the blame if the allegations prove to be true. The NCAA could also give Louisville the death penalty, grounding the basketball powerhouse.

Auburn coach Bruce Pearl could face similar heat.

He coached at Tennessee from 2005 11 before being fired and hit with a three year show cause penalty by the NCAA for lying to investigators about recruiting violations. Pearl was given a second chance at Auburn, but another scandal could spell trouble for him if the allegations are proven true.

Regardless of whether the federal probe leads all the way to the top, the programs could take a hit and not just from the NCAA.

With the prospect of an NCAA investigation on the horizon, top recruits may stay away. Current players in the programs could be declared ineligible if the probe finds they accepted money from an agent or an assistant coach.

Arizona coach Sean Miller has one of the top recruiting classes for 2018, and the Wildcats have been projected to be a top 10 team this season. Andy Enfield has a strong incoming recruiting class at Southern California and has a potential top 10 team this season.

The trajectory of the two Pac 12 programs could be altered as the probe deepens.

And the initial charges could be just the tip of the iceberg. More programs and coaches could be entangled as the FBI digs deeper, and schools where the arrested coaches previously worked could face scrutiny.

This is far from over, and the implications could last for years.

ArticlesUPDATE: Many in Merrimack Valley to remain without power until late Friday night, National Grid saysUsed Apple Store owner evicted from Derry shopPolice: $70,000 worth of cocaine seized from man who took package from porch of Lawrence homeDerry mourns passing ofDon BallMan arrested in Lawrence drug investigationPolice: Man shot in neck in Lawrence during robberyResidents struggle with deplorable conditions in Lawrence buildingPolice: Loaded gun found in bed where 3 year old child sleeps in Lawrence homeUPDATE: National Grid rolls back earlier optimistic estimates on power restorationPowder found at scene of unattended death in Andover
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old adidas predators Collinsville’s Mallory Vaughn selected to Adidas All

Mallory Vaughn stopped growing when she reached high school but only by the yardstick’s measure.

Since the abrupt ending of her junior season in early March, the Collinsville basketball whiz has continued to improve herself, even pulling in top honors for her summer efforts.

Enthusiasm spilling through the telephone, Vaughn explained in an interview with the Owasso Reporter how she has some exciting developments in store for her senior season.

“I’ve definitely started stepping out and shooting a lot more this summer,” she said. “I’m definitely starting to take more of a guard role.”

At 6 foot 5 pounds, Vaughn has been a force in Class 5A for three years. She has been the primary chess piece on her mother Susie Vaughn’s white board as the Lady Cardinals have made state tournament appearances in two of those seasons.

The senior will make the transition to college in a year, though, and her role there will change.

“I know in college,
jeremy scott adidas Collinsville's Mallory Vaughn selected to Adidas All
I’m going to play more of a forward or guard position,” Mallory Vaughn said. “Just because I’m tall enough, but my build is not big enough to play a college [center].”

Vaughn’s PWP team competed in the league final July 10 12 in Dallas. Alongside Edmond Santa Fe’s RaVon Nero, Muskogee’s Trena Mims, and other talented regional players such as Broken Arrow’s Jalise Smallwood and Gabby Gregory of Holland Hall, Vaughn has enough on the court motivation to make a charge in her final Collinsville season.

“It’s kind of scary, especially because I know wherever I go to college is going to be far,” she said. “It makes you work harder,
jeremy scott adidas Collinsville's Mallory Vaughn selected to Adidas All
just kind of savor everything a little more than I did last year.”